Person Sheet


NameJohn Johann Herman DIEKHERBER DIEKHERBERS35,38,41,36
Birth19 Feb 1793, Ohrter Mersch, Germany
DeathFeb 1855, Josephsville, Mo.
BurialThe ship, "Alexander" #35638
Birth16 Feb 1793, Ohrtermersch, Niedersachsen, Hannover, Germany42
DeathFeb 1855, Josephville, St. Charles, Mo.
Death1 Feb 1855, Josephville35
BaptismLuthern
FatherJohann Hermann DIEKHERBERS (1753-1831)
MotherAnna Margarethe Elisabeth Margaretha LENGEHAUS (1751-~1801)
Spouses
1Catherine Margareta Margaretha Adelheid Adelhide KRAMERS KRAMER35,38,41,36
Birth13 Jan 1806, Ohrter Fange Germany35
Death22 Dec 1888, Josephsville, Mo.38
Birth13 Jan 1806, Ohrter Fange Germany38
Birth13 Jan 1806, Orthe-Fange, Hannover, Germany
Death22 Dec 1888, Josephville, Mo.35
FatherJohann Hinrich KRAMERS (~1778-1837)
MotherHelena Margaretha DENNIGMANN (1769-1837)
Marriage13 Feb 1833, Bippen, Germany
ChildrenMargaret Adelaide (1834-1911)
John Herman (1840-)
John Henry (1842-1917)
Herman Heinrick (1846-)
Hyginius "Eugene" (1850-1929)
son2 JHH
son3 JHH
son4 JHH
Notes for John Johann Herman DIEKHERBER DIEKHERBERS
John and his family Immigrated to the united states in the autum of 1837. At that time they had one daughter Margaret Adelaide who was born in Germany. He was listed as a Heuerling (hired hand). John was born in the town of Ohrter-Mersch Germany. The Name at that time was spelled with an (e) instead of a (c), Diekherbers. The abstract also contains this version in several places. Prior to that time the name was spelled Herbers. The name was changed to Diekherber some time between the time John's father was born and the time he got married. The parish church was in Bippen, several miles from the family farm. The church is over a thousand years old and is of the Evangelical Lutheran faith. Bippen is about 10 miles from Furstenau where the Dickherbers were first thought to have originated. Also the farm is still there and the Diekherbers still own it. Herman and his family embarked from Breman Germany and arrived in New Orleans Dec 26th. 1837 aboard the ship "Alexander" ( #356 ). The first American records of the family were found by Carolyn Roth in the archives of Friedens Church in St. Charles, Mo. In 1992, Toby and Cathy Gnade (nee Dickherber) went to Germany with the express purpose of finding our ancesters. We could find nothing at Furstenau so we next went to the Lutheran See in Munster and went through their micro-fisch films. We were not having any luck there either until we found the name in one of the entries. It was a wedding record and gave a Diekherbers as one of the in-laws using her maiden name, and living in Ohrter Mersch. We showed it to to one of the custodians and he said " Oh! Bippen". He got the Bippen books and there were the records, everything we wanted to know. Next, we ventured to Bippen and toured the village and St. Georg Evangelican Luthern church where we found two war memorials, one for each World War. Both contained names of Diekherbers who had been killed in those wars. We also got to visit some of the Diekherbers in Ohrter Mersch on the family farm. They didn't speak english and we didn't speak German so it was sort of frusterating. We do intend to go back one day with an interpreter and find out all we want to know about the Diekherbers name.
Misc. Notes
[DickherberWillott.FTW]

John and his family Immigrated to the united states in the autum of 1837. At that time they had one daughter Margaret Adelaide who was born in Germany. He was listed as a Heuerling (hired hand). John was born in the town of Ohrter-Mersch Germany.
The Name at that time was spelled with an (e) instead of a (c), Diekherbers. The abstract also contains this version in several places. Prior to that time the name was spelled Herbers. The name was changed to Diekherber some time between the
time John's father was born and the time he got married. The parish church was in Bippen, several miles from the family farm. The church is over a thousand years old and is of the Evangelical Lutheran faith. Bippen is about 10 miles from
Furstenau where the Dickherbers were first thought to have originated. Also the farm is still there and the Diekherbers still own it. Herman and his family embarked from Breman Germany and arrived in New Orleans Dec 26th. 1837 aboard the ship
"Alexander" ( #356 ). The first American records of the family were found by Carolyn Roth in the archives of Friedens Church in St. Charles, Mo. In 1992, Toby and Cathy Gnade (nee Dickherber) went to Germany with the express purpose of finding
our ancesters. We could find nothing at Furstenau so we next went to the Lutheran See in Munster and went through their micro-fisch films. We were not having any luck there either until we found the name in one of the entries. It was a wedding
record and gave a Diekherbers as one of the in-laws using her maiden name, and living in Ohrter Mersch. We showed it to to one of the custodians and he said " Oh! Bippen". He got the Bippen books and there were the records, everything we wanted
to know. Next, we ventured to Bippen and toured the village and St. Georg Evangelican Luthern church where we found two war memorials, one for each World War. Both contained names of Diekherbers who had been killed in those wars. We also got to
visit some of the Diekherbers in Ohrter Mersch on the family farm. They didn't speak english and we didn't speak German so it was sort of frusterating. We do intend to go back one day with an interpreter and find out all we want to know about
the Diekherbers name.Danny Dickherber has information that he was born John Herman Herbers. His marriage license had the name Dickherbers with the "s" on the end.

No Lutheran Church in Josephville, so he went to Friedens Church in St. Charles.

See facts page about immigration information including ship's name & date
He left for America September, 1937.
Last Modified 10 Jun 2002Created 15 Nov 2002 by Reunion for Macintosh

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